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Question(s) Thread

Discussion in 'Beginner's Corner' started by M4R, Apr 17, 2017.

  1. Drew

    Drew Spring Cap

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    I don't think that's really necessary. There's plenty of people out there making youtube videos and blogs/forum posts about different build methods, albeit not always in English. It's part of what makes 4WD a fun hobby. Search, learn, research images, brain storm ideas.

    You'll start to see what you need to do after building a few cars and then start to develop your own methods and styles. I think that's what is important overall.
     
  2. celt63

    celt63 Screw

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    These are real general questions guys.
    Is there a chassis target weight you are working towards? I know 90 grams is the minimum and pretty hard to achieve. I see pretty extensive effort to get weight down and understand the benefits much the same as it is in RC racing. Wondering if there is a sweet spot you are targeting.

    Second, chassis height from track surface. Do you try to get as close as you can to 1mm or is that just for front and rear brakes?
     
  3. Drew

    Drew Spring Cap

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    I can't answer your first question, but the second is a basic of all motor racing.
    The only restriction is there must be a 1mm gap between the track and the cars lowest point/s. Most of the time I think the chassis is lowered mainly by just using low profile wheels and sanding down the tires. It's the easiest way to lower a car, but lowering the chassis is much harder since you need to move the axle mount points and requires extensive modification. That said, the easiest chassis to lower would be the MA and MS, you can get an idea by looking for suspension builds.
     
  4. warwick

    warwick Screw

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    My safe preferences would be around 115 to 120 g. 125is if its MA/Ms chassis. Depends on what type of material the chassis made off. Around 105 to 110 if I want to get dangerous
     
    Last edited: Aug 11, 2017
  5. celt63

    celt63 Screw

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    OK...I have some work to do, my MS chassis are pigs...
     
  6. warwick

    warwick Screw

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    Chill man. Ms ma are heavy.
     
  7. OrangeBang

    OrangeBang Lock Nut

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    CA guys usually hit the 180gm mark with Eneloop batteries, which are 56gm a pair. Heavy cars has it's place depending on the type of track you're racing on. Sometimes you have short jumps (1 straight after a jump) and having a ultra light car, you might as well be standing there with a baseball glove ready to catch. So I believe it's dependent on the track layout. Heavy can work, and so can light. I think the best way to think about it is this. Each tuning attribute is connected. When you raise one aspect (speed, weight) it can improve one area and decrease another. So heavy car will need super fast motor to pull the weight, while the light car can use a slower motor and stay on par. I hope I'm conveying my thoughts properly. lol. Maybe an infographic is in order.

    Tamiya rules state 1mm clearance all around. We use the Tamiya setting gauge (http://www.tamiya.com/english/products/95300/index.htm) and the tip of it should be able to slide around and under your car without touching.

    Chassis height plays a part with brake attachement and the contact point of a slope/bank. Some chassis have more flexibility than others, but generally if your chassis is lower then your brake attachment/contact point is lower. Brake height will determine if you will jump far or short, and if you can make a 20/40/60/80deg bank. Raise the brake the clear the bank, could make you fly out of the jump right after. Lower the brake to clear the jump, and you may slow down too much during the bank. The sweet spot is track dependent.

    I think the forum can serve as that guide and a reliable hub for all the information scattered out there...as long as everyone is willing to participate in contributing information.
     
  8. zerosc

    zerosc Washer

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    any one got any info on these tires. are they any good or dont even waste my time
     

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  9. Dxn Provisions

    Dxn Provisions Moderator

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    I think just hang them on your wall, they pretty dated. I have a few sets myself.
     
  10. zerosc

    zerosc Washer

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    cool thanks on that. gotta a few more things today somr of it i know i can use at some point
     

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